Topics

Ontario

Ontario election: What’s in it for people who rent?

A look at what the PC, Liberal and NDP platforms do for renters

Centralize, digitize, privatize: unpacking Ontario’s welfare reforms

Changes open the system up to privatization by for-profit multinationals

Ontario budget falls flat on funding for public services

The Ontario government has tabled its election budget. Public services got short shrift.

The straight answer: Education funding in Ontario has dropped since 2018

A strong public education system that allows all children to recover from these difficult years is possible

Why Ontario needs to raise more revenue

Ontario has lagged behind other provinces for a long time

Settler Work: Equity and safety gaps in Canada's public transit systems

Exploring the structural, organizational and systemic barriers to equitable public transit service, using the Thunder Bay system as a case study.

It’s not the carbon tax that’s driving up gas prices

The solution to high gasoline prices is to reduce our reliance on fossil fuels altogether

Pandemic, privatization and people power

A brief history on the attack of Canada’s public transit system and how we’re trying to defend it

The future of Ottawa’s transit after the light rail debacle

I remember the excitement I felt when Ottawa’s long-awaited light rail train finally opened to the public. But what it promised and what it delivered turned out to be two very different realities. Why did this happen, and what does this mean for the future of Ottawa’s transit?

Ontario’s rosy revenue picture isn’t helping public services

If new revenues go to tax cuts, not public services, we will all pay the price

Finding the funding

Remarks to the Standing Committee on Finance and Economic Affairs regarding the 2022-23 Ontario budget on Jan. 19, 2022

Budget outlook: $5 billion in annual tax cuts weaken Ontario’s case for federal dollars

If the provincial government needs more money—and it certainly does—then why has it been giving so much away?

As revenues boom, Queen’s Park tightens the screws

The biggest bite will come out of health care.

A $15 minimum wage: Workers paid a steep price for the three-year delay

Minimum wage workers could ill-afford the cost of these lost wages.

Show your support

Since the beginning of the pandemic, our writers and researchers have provided groundbreaking commentary and analysis that has shaped Canada's response to COVID-19. We've fought for better supports for workers affected by pandemic closures, safer working conditions on the frontline, and more. With the launch of the new Monitor site, we're working harder than ever to share even more progressive news, views and ideas for Canada's road to recovery. Help us grow.

Support the Monitor