CUSMA's labour mechanisms a testing ground for protecting North American workers

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Media Democracy and Combatting Misinformation

July/August 2021 Issue

"Canada is no stranger to dynastic ownership of its media companies," writes Robin Shaban in her feature article. "Thomson, Atkinson, Black, Irving: each family name is synonymous with the control of major press operations, either nationally or regionally. Governments have been aware of this issue for decades, but they’ve done little to address it."

For years, Canada has had more concentrated media ownership than our American counterparts. How does this impact our ability as a nation to tell and receive diverse and nuanced stories from a multitude of viewpoints? And, in the age of fake news farms and QAnon, what role could a revitalized media democracy movement play in combatting misinformation?

Our latest issue of the Monitor digs into these questions and more with views from across the country. To receive the print version of our magazine delivered to your home or office and support our work, make a donation to the CCPA today.

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