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Settler work: Answering the call

Digging into reconciliation, the TRC calls to action and the role of settlers in repairing harm

Call for submissions: Twenty years of anti-terror

On December 18, 2001, Canada's Anti-terrorism Act received Royal Assent. The two decades since have seen a rise in Islamophobia, as well as increased surveillance of, and police violence towards protests. How do we rebuild after two decades of anti-terrorism acts and actions?

First do no harm? Weight stigma by the numbers

Decolonizing the food justice movement also requires us to examine the deeply held anti-fat biases that permeate many of these spaces. The Monitor Index details how deep this bias goes and how damaging it is.

It’s time to decolonize food

Decolonizing food means much more than being choosy about where you harvest and source your meats and veggies. It’s about being aware that every decision you make has an effect on everything, including what you choose to put in your body.

From rebels to hipsters: Former FARC guerrillas turn to craft beer

Following the historic ceasefire accord of June 2016, former members of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia have faced stigma when reintegrating into Colombia's formal economy. One solution? Microbrewing.

Back to basics

When it comes to how we approach food programming, we're in dire need of a cultural overhaul.

The gentrification of food: A Mexican example

Mexico City’s Pujol is considered by international critics as one of Mexico’s most prestigious restaurants. But Enrique Olvera has built his prestige upon the appropriation of traditional Mesoamerican ingredients, making his dishes palatable to mainly white and international audiences.

Demanding justice: Can trade policy be fair?

What role can international trade agreements play in combatting climate change and closing gender gaps?

Five books to understand... Media democracy

In this new Monitor feature we invite a prominent Canadian to provide a reading list for better understanding a pressing topic.

We need stronger anti-monopoly laws if we want to curb corporate influence in the news

Canada is no stranger to dynastic ownership of its media companies

Weaponizing fact-checking: What Canada needs to know

A strong fact-checking industry can stop the normalization of lying and advocate for policy changes. But the weaponization of fact-checking can cause irreversible harm.

The media hasn’t even begun to reckon with sexual violence and neither have we

For decades, the media has been circling the issue of sexual violence, mirroring society’s discomfort.

Why can’t we know more about what political parties know about us?

As it stands right now, political parties in Canada face little oversight or transparency requirements for the data they collect and create about Canadian citizens.

“Whoever controls the media, controls the mind”

Media concentration in [the U.S. and Brazil] has reached phenomenal levels, and it is compounded by the massive spread of pernicious fake news.

No matter what your first issue is, media democracy is your second

Canadians need to face our history of violence, and we need a mediascape that can help us do this complicated, messy work.

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